Think Global, Sticky Note Plan

When you have a marketing campaign with an international audience in mind, it always pays to take lessons from the best global brands in the game. Time and again these brands show us how global marketing should be done (and sometimes how it shouldn’t) so listen up and take some notes.

You don’t need a global name to nail international marketing either, as you’ll see from a couple of the brands we’re looking at today. Which means firms of all sizes have something to learn from these global marketing lessons by the best in the business.

Video marketing lessons from Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola is the king of video localisation in just about every market around. From the developing streets of Vietnam to the migrant workforces building super-modern Singapore, Coca-Cola features real people and local footage to tell a compelling story in every campaign it runs.

The key here is to show your target audience they’re getting the best from your products or services. Now, you may not be able to jet off to every corner of the world like Coca-Cola, but you can always start small by paying a visit to your biggest overseas market and supplement your video with voice overs where you can – something many businesses come to our voice over studio for.

Audience engagement lessons from Airbnb

Airbnb started with a couple of guys who couldn’t pay their rent – far from the glamour we associate with worldwide brands. However, Airbnb nails global marketing in a way no other startup has managed, and it’s hard to pick a single lesson from its brief. From translation to excellent website localisation this digital enterprise is consistent everywhere it goes, but the lesson we want to pick out in this case is getting your audience involved.

In 2013 Airbnb released its Hollywood & Vines campaign, with a video of the same name, entirely made of Vine videos shot by people from around the world and directed via Twitter.

Cultural branding lessons from Red Bull

On Red Bull’s infinite list of target markets we have South Korea, a country where rapid growth has seen tradition mix with modernisation like no other place in the world. Red Bull finds the perfect balance between South Korea’s national sport, Tae Kwon Do – a martial art that revolves around the science of kicking – and the nation’s thriving pop culture with its Kick It events, designed specifically for South Korea.

Growth lessons from H&M

H&M Global Branded Stores

Not long ago, rumour had it that high street shopping was dead, but a few brands have managed to go from strength to strength through recession and rise of the internet alike. In fact, H&M has mastered both by offering rock-bottom prices on fashion gear alongside premium lines to suit every budget – both online and offline.

More importantly, the Swedish brand has excelled overseas with a website translated for more than 40 of its 59 markets, offering online shopping for 21 of them, in addition to its stores – figures that will only grow. Which just goes to show you can focus growth on certain markets and expand your overseas efforts as they become more profitable.

Ask people where Red Bull or H&M were founded and few people would probably be able to tell you – and not because they’re unknown brands. Far better than that, they are truly international brands that associate with every nation they target. The likes of Coca-Cola have a much tougher task from being so famously American – but that hasn’t stopped them becoming one of the biggest international brands in Vietnam, less than 40 years after the “American War” ended.

This article was originally posted on Matinee Multilingual:

Having completed a Diploma in Digital Marketing, awarded from the Chartered Institute of Marketing, Lauren became the Digital Marketing Manager for Matinée Multilingual. Matinée specialise in the production and translation of audio, video and multimedia content. Lauren enjoys keeping on top of industry news and sharing it through their blog and social media channels.

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